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Hi I'm Nathan Wilde

I'm a singer, I'm a scouter, and I'm a Mormon.

About Me

I've always loved singing. Ever since I was a little kid, I would wander around my house screaming Disney songs at the top of my lungs. In my sophomore year of high school I joined a school choir. Then next year, I was on the varsity choir and was doing honor choirs, including the Idaho Allstate choir. My senior year, I got third place in the tenor category at a state solo competition. It was awesome to know that out of all the many tenors in the state of Idaho that participated in that competition, I had received third place. In 2017, after I return from serving my mission in Carlsbad California, one path I might take is to attend Brigham Young University and try to get a spot on that college's famous A Capella group, Vocal Point. Scouting is another one of my passions. Like any other LDS kid, I joined Cub Scouts at the age of 8. Like any other LDS kid, at 12 I became a Boy Scout, and like any other LDS kid I attended scout camp a few times. That is usually where the scouting experience ends for most boys. But that isn't even close to the end of my story as a scout. I started working at Island Park Scout Camp, and have worked there for five years, working anywhere from the Climbing tower to the Waterfront, from Rank Advancement to Administration. I also have done a lot of work in the Order of the Arrow, scouting's honor society. In the future I hope to be a scoutmaster to pass on this love to other boys. Other likes: golf, soccer, ballroom dance and broadcasting

Why I am a Mormon

I have been a Mormon my entire life. When I was a little kid, of course I was too young to question my parents trying to teach me about the gospel. But by the time I was old enough to decide for myself if I was going to do my own thing or if I would stick with the church, I had already had enough experiences to point me in the right way. The big ones in my young life were when I first got up to bear my testimony in church, and when I was baptized and my sins were washed away. When I was finished bearing my testimony and when I left the water, I felt SO good, indescribably happy. The same feeling has come to me a number of times since then, at just the right times when I was starting to question it all or when I was feeling down in the dumps. It came when I was given the Aaronic priesthood when I was 12, and again when I was made a leader over some of the guys in my age group. Around the time of my graduating from high school was when I hit a lot of them - when I opened my mission call, getting the Melchizedek priesthood, using that priesthood to give a blessing, and going to the temple. It might sound cheesy or impossible, but during those times I felt a whole different feeling that I don't feel everyday, and that I don't feel everywhere. It is, like I said, an indescribably happy feeling. These feelings couldn't be just random emotions - there is absolutely no way. They are the Spirit, and I cannot and will not ever deny that.

How I live my faith

In the LDS church, when it comes to finding ways to spend our time and talents, we look for things that are good, better, and best. I used to spend quite a lot of time on computers or TVs, which can be a good thing, but there are, of course, much better things to do with my life. Something I think has really been pounded into my life is that of serving others at all times (being a Scouter will do that to you). My parents, my time as a staff member at scout camp, and my church has pushed that on my until I really have come to realize that there is really nothing better than giving up your own problems and trying to fix other people's problems. I love brightening people's days. I live my faith not only by serving others, but also by being an example. There are a lot of people younger than me that I work with, especially at scout camp. That week that I get to interact with them is the time I have to leave a lasting impression on them - my time to teach them something, whether it be good or bad. I try (the keyword here is try) to always be doing things I would be comfortable giving anyone else permission to do.