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Hi I'm David

My dad is a physicist; I'm a computer programmer and former ESL teacher. I'm a Mormon.

About Me

I've been interested in electronics and computers since a child, and currently (2012) work as a software developer for a Fortune 500 company. I also like commuting by bicycle, studying world languages, history, astronomy, and basic carpentry. Before attending graduate school, I worked for a year as an English as a Second Language teacher for public schools. I am married and have three children.

Why I am a Mormon

I have ancestors who walked across the Plains with Brigham Young, and both my parents were active members of the Church when I was born (and still are). However, even so, I had to choose to be active in the Church. My dad read the Book of Mormon to us regularly, without comment; when I was old enough, I read it through myself. I also read C.S. Lewis, portions of the Qur'an, Socrates, Ayn Rand, communist and socialist philosophers, alternative translations of the Bible, and many other writings. When I was 18 and away at college, I had opportunities to walk alone in the woods and pray freely, almost like Enos or Joseph Smith; when doing so, I was struck by the beauty of God's creation and convinced of the wisdom of participating in, supporting, and conforming my life to the teachings of the Church. As I have married an LDS woman and seen our children, my younger siblings, and others I have associated with grow in the gospel, I remain convinced that this is Jesus' church.

How I live my faith

My current formal responsibility is as "audiovisual coordinator", which means I set up and take down TVs, video projectors and microphones before meetings where videos or satellite broadcasts will be shown. I also serve as a "home teacher", where I visit the homes of other members and "watch over" them. I also help out with service-projects organized by my congregation. I serve as an additional chaperone or driver for youth-groups as needed. I help with "FamilySearch Indexing", entering names from historical records in a standard format that would make it easier for others to find them. I help with other, non-Church-sponsored, community genealogy projects. I am a member of Neighborhood Watch where I live, and Community Emergency Response Team. I take my family out to pick up trash on nearby blocks from time to time. When I was 19, I served for two years as a full-time missionary in another U.S. state. A few years later, I served for about a year and a half as a general assistant to the local ecclesiastical leader. I have also been an instructor for adult men; a librarian; and a nursery-worker.

Why are only some Mormons allowed into temples? Is there something secret going on in Mormon Temples? What goes on in Mormon Temples?

David
I had the opportunity to help replace carpets in a temple once while it was still dedicated but not operational. As I walked down the half-darkened corridors, I felt that I was in a place apart from the world, safe, about to meet God. I've felt that in a slightly different way while in operational temples. There is nothing I've participated in at the Temple that I wasn't fully prepared for by the Scriptures and by printed materials anyone could obtain a copy of. However, that's not to say I didn't learn anything there. Most importantly, however, the commitments I made in the temple were stronger because I had had to prepare myself to be worthy to enter. The Temple marriage ceremony is a good example for talking about why only certain Church members can enter. The couple, sealer, witnesses and other guests all are adults who have been taught the significance of the ceremony. In fact, no temple has a sealing-room that can seat more than about 20 people; a Mormon family might hold a large reception after the wedding, but the ceremony itself is performed in the presence of a few worthy people and God. Show more Show less