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Hi I'm Dick.

I love sports, woodworking, learning, and traveling. I'm a husband, father, and engineer. I'm a Mormon.

About Me

My parents said that I was born with a ball in my hands. This love of sports brought me great joy growing up. Now that I am getting a bit more "mature", I no longer play organized sports, but I still enjoy being active and striving to stay fit. I am also finding great joy teaching and watching my boys play the sports and that I loved so much growing up. I enjoy woodworking. When I was younger, I spent many hours with my father in his wood shop. It is always amazing to me to see a piece of raw wood transformed into a beautiful piece of furniture or some other "work of art". I love to learn. Whether it be reading a book, attending a seminar, or having enriching experiences, I love to better understand myself, others, and this wonderful world in which we live. My career as an engineer also has afforded me opportunities to learn new things, visit new places, stretch myself, and develop my talents. My wife, two boys, and I enjoy traveling. We love visiting different cities, experiencing different cultures, and enjoying the beauties and wonder of nature. My greatest joy, however, is being a husband, father, member of an extended family, and friend to those with whom I associate. I have found that it is my relationships that matter most. They also bring me the greatest joy.

Why I am a Mormon

God didn't mean a lot to me growing up. Although I and my family were Mormons, I didn't go to church. Although I tried be a good boy, I found myself doing some things just because my friends did them. As I got into high school, I became aware that I wanted more with my life. I think that there was an underlying craving for a set of values and direction to help guide my life. I think that God knew what I wanted and needed as well. During my senior year in high school I had an experience which confirmed to me that there is a God and that He was aware of me and my desires. I tasted of His love for me in a very personal way. I felt of His desire to help me become who I wanted to be and, more importantly, become who He wanted me to be. As a result of this experience, I began attending church again. At first it was a little awkward, but the members of my ward loved me and were very kind to me. I had opportunities to serve which helped my testimony to grow. I also had a strong desire to bring my life into harmony with God's teachings and to keep His commandments. I began reading the scriptures -- particularly the Book of Mormon. Although I didn't understand everything at first, I kept at it. Before reading the scriptures, I would pray to Heavenly Father and ask for His help in understanding what I was about to read. When I finished reading, I would say another prayer and thank Heavenly Father for His help. With time, my understanding grew and I found my mind opening up and being filled with light. By following this pattern, my testimony grew by leaps and bounds. My desire to serve also blossomed. The gospel of Jesus Christ became an anchor in my life and has helped to direct all of the decisions that I have had to make sense the time of my experience nearly 40 years ago. I truly did find what I was looking for -- God showed me the way I needed and wanted to go.

How I live my faith

The Church has given me many opportunities to serve. I have had the great pleasure of working with the youth. Whether it be in the capacity of a teacher, a boy scout leader, or pulling a handcart as part of a pioneer trek reenactment, I have always found it to be an enjoyable and rewarding experience to spend time with the youth. I particularly enjoy providing service to those in need. One cannot provide selfless service to another without feeling better about oneself. In addition, by being part of a larger organized group, our collective efforts can really make a difference to those whose needs require more than just individual attention.