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Hi I'm Julie

I'm a married mother and grandmother. I am a physical therapist. I'm a Mormon.

About Me

I have raised 4 sons who are all in grad school or working and am now the grandmother of eight. I'm the 9th of 10 children so I also have lots of nieces and nephews. I love discussing what I heard on NPR with my kids or neighbors or co-workers. I went to school in Utah, Sweden, and California and I try to incorporate Swedish food and traditions into my family's activities. I'm not much of a cook or very craftsy but I love sports, especially soccer and love researching family history. As a physical therapist I work at an inpatient skilled rehab facility that specializes in severe trauma and medically complex patients. I love solving problems and seeing my patients progress.

Why I am a Mormon

Although I was raised in a faithful Latter-day Saint home, I went away as an exchange student when I was just a teenager. I had an opportunity to live with a family who were not of my faith, and in fact there was no one within many miles of my location who were members of the Church of Jesus Christ. I understood very quickly that I had an opportunity to decide whether to continue to attend church and strive to be an active and faithful member, or not. No one there would be watching or know. In fact, in many ways it would make my family life easier because I could participate each Sunday in the outdoor activities my host family participated in. I went with them a few times in the first couple of months, but realized my heart yearned to be with the Saints and that I cherished the association I had there and the feelings I felt. It was at some personal and financial sacrifice that I from then on traveled each week to the small branch about 30 km away, and although I didn't yet speak the language, I played the piano for sacrament meeting and participated as best I could. I also strove to read my scriptures and pray regularly. When Christmas came around and it was clear that a Christ-centered tradition was not strong in the household, I spent time on my own on Christmas Eve reading the story of Christ's birth from the Gospels and the Book of Mormon. I knew more strongly than ever before that the Book of Mormon was true and that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was the pathway that I would choose throughout my life that would lead me to happiness and give me the strength and understanding that I needed no matter what my circumstances. I have continued to make choices to lead me along this same path and have felt my own life and my family's life blessed. I have seen others around me make different choices and either experience heartache or lack the fulness of joy I feel that living the gospel of Jesus Christ affords.

How I live my faith

I feel part of my responsibility as a follower of Jesus Christ is to seek to help others and to be an example of the believer in word and deed. While I'm by no means perfect, I think that means speaking kindly to others at work and in the neighborhood, seeking to be a peacemaker or not participating in negative conversations at work or other settings, looking for opportunities to help others. I was taught long ago that a leader best emulates the Savior by being a servant-leader, as He truly lifted and led others by serving them, so I try to smooth the pathway of the employees I supervise and be aware and concerned for their overall welfare. In my congregation (called a ward), I currently serve with the young women, ages 12-18. We teach and facilitate activities as we build each others' testimonies. I have held many volunteer "jobs" (called callings) at church, and while the ones I enjoy the most are probably teaching, I gladly serve in whatever capacity I am asked since there is no paid ministry and we believe we are all part of God's kingdom and need to help build it up wherever we are. I also visit a number of families each month with a companion to check on their welfare and leave a spiritual message as appropriate. I feel one can only live the way God wants us to live if we are striving to do what He asks of us, and asking what He wants of us, so I try to regularly read the Holy Scriptures and pray. In this way I can take small steps on the pathway to his admonition to "be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father in Heaven is perfect".

Why was a Restoration of the Gospel needed? Haven’t we always had the Bible?

Julie
A careful study of the history of Christianity after the time of Christ reveals that the authority and pure doctrines of Christ and the Apostles were lost. Some did their best to continue the traditions but without revelation to a prophet like Adam, Noah or Moses or the authority to administer saving ordinances such as baptism and the laying on of hands to receive the Holy Ghost (see Acts 8:14-20) it was impossible. Through the Dark Ages neither true authority from God nor revelation was present on the earth. Errors had crept into the Bible, some benignly and some wilfully. Yet Christ's apostles had prophesied that a time of restoration or refreshing would come. What the earth needed was not merely a reformation of distorted doctrines, but a true restoration of authority, revelation and the full and pure truths of the gospel that had been lost see Acts 3:21 and Ephesians 1:10. Many things contributed to and prepared the earth for this to occur, such as the printing and translation of the Bible by devout men, some of whom gave their lives so this could happen, the Reformation movement that spurred men to question the dogma that had been preached through the centuries, and a political climate that allowed dissent to occur and "new" religions to flourish. Then He could send his authorized ministers to restore priesthood authority and establish a new prophet on the earth for this time or dispensation. Show more Show less