What Is a Church Community?
Loading.....

The video player could not be built.

Do you want to chat with a missionary?

We are happy to answer any questions you may have. Start a chat or call us at 1-888-537-6600.

Hi I'm Felipe

I'm a Mormon.

About Me

Originally from Brazil, I grew up in the U.S. most of my life and will soon be finishing my undergrad in Finance and Philosophy. I have a fabulous wife and a one-year old daughter that make my life. My wife and I met while swing dancing (lindy hop) and we both enjoy a good dance every now and again in our kitchen. When I am not studying or spending time with my family, I enjoy reading a good book or trying to brush up on a foreign language.

Why I am a Mormon

Though born into the Church, I am a Mormon not because of tradition or heritage. As a young teenager--and oldest child in a single-parent home--whether what I had learned my whole life was true or false became very important to me. After labored study, I sought God out in prayer and received an answer I cannot deny. I have also had many other related experiences confirming time and time again that this is the work of God. For instance, recently I had the opportunity to be married for eternity in the temple. I didn't anticipate it at all, but the sacred power I felt as my wife and I were pronounced husband and wife was yet another confirmation that the ordinance, and thus, the Priesthood officiating the ordinance is of God, and that my family can be together forever. I am fully convinced that any man or woman who sincerely seeks to understand and then ask God whether the Church is true for his/herself will gain the same conviction. That said, it is my witness that one need only strive to live the Gospel of Jesus Christ as taught in its fullness, and he/she will begin to experience its divine promises. Incidentally, the principles taught by modern-day prophets have strengthened my family and have helped me become a far better son, brother, father, and student.

How I live my faith

I don't think "continual improvement" would be a bad description. When I was a young kid I was conscientious about being honest, using appropriate language, reading daily from the scriptures, and forgiving others. As I grew up I began to care more about being altruistic, helping without being asked, and seeking to be there for others. I began to care about being a good example to my family and friends. As I became a teenager I started to really pay attention to how I used my time and began to inquire deeply about how to best be an instrument in God's hands and help others. My faith has quite naturally permeated into my most important decision making--how to be a good husband and father, what kind of career I want to pursue, etc. Looking back, I've made my share of mistakes, but I am constantly trying to improve. My faith makes me a better person and has given me real hope that I can have a successful family and influence the lives of many others for good as I become a better disciple of Jesus Christ.

Do you really believe there is a prophet like Moses alive today?

Felipe
Not only do I believe it, the proof is in the living of his words. Take a simple recent address from one of the Presidents of the Church and put the principles taught to the test. The real question is whether God has truly called a prophet today as He did Moses. Nobody would know better than God himself--so why not ask Him? Show more Show less

Do Mormons worship Joseph Smith?

Felipe
Of course not. A cursory reading of the Book of Mormon or a Sunday School manual or an article on the website could quickly make this clear. That said, how do Jews view Moses? They do not address him in prayer, but surely they are grateful for the guidance he received. Likewise, I am extremely grateful for Joseph Smith and the guidance he received and all I have learned from His ministry--similar to the way I am grateful for the words of Paul. I have never in my 25 years of being in the Church, however, even thought of praying to Joseph Smith or heard of anyone who has. Anyone who perpetuates the myth is likely flailing false hearsay. Show more Show less