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Hi I'm Katie B.

I'm a newly-married almost-college-grad, and I'm a Mormon!

About Me

Today, I'm a newlywed college student majoring in speech pathology. I'm passionate about building up individuals, families and communities, and my major helps with that. I'm also a big fan of crafting and cooking, and hope to use them to benefit my family. What I've discovered is that the gospel of Jesus Christ has the solutions to all of life's problems: for my problems, my friends' struggles, for society, etc. It's pretty amazing, and motivates me to keep learning and to grow closer to my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. I grew up in a large family in the suburban Midwest. Although as a child I thought that a big family was a big pain, as I grew older I appreciated them more and more. Since I've been away from home for some time, I value and put more effort into continuing to develop my relationships with my parents and siblings as we all get older. Now that I'm married, that priority on family relationships has carried over to how my husband and I treat each other. College has been a major growing experience! I've come to understand myself better, learn how I can build others up, and expanded my interests and talents further. It was good preparation for marriage, and now I have even more support, motivation, and opportunity for serving others. The more I put my trust in Heavenly Father and His Son Jesus Christ, the more I'm enabled to go out and do things; the more life experience I have, the more I'm convinced that the gospel of Christ is the only path for true happiness.

Why I am a Mormon

I was born into a family that has been members of the Church for generations on both sides. Since I was a child, my parents taught me things that brought me closer to Christ. As I've grown up, I've been able to see for myself that life is more enjoyable and meaningful when I follow the counsel and commandments of Jesus Christ and His servants on the earth. I feel a sense of security and purity when I choose to wear modest clothing. When I try to be more loving and Christlike, I feel happier as I value the people around me and see that they, too, are children of God, just like I am. When I regularly read the Book of Mormon, I feel greater peace and understanding in my life, and I learn more about my Savior and I can see how to become more like Him. Small, repeated affirmations through my life remind me why I am a Mormon so that when life gets hard, I don't need to doubt, and I can move forward trusting in what I already know.

How I live my faith

My faith has done a lot to shape who I am and who I want to be. The teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints lead me to be a better person. I like what I see in others and myself when they or I follow the commandments, so I keep going and do what I can each day. I have a pretty sensitive conscience, so that helps me self-regulate my thoughts and actions. Some days are harder than others, and that's just the way life is. But I try really hard to remember what's important, and as I hold on to what I've learned before, I can ride out the storm and know that everything will be ok. My husband and I have both tried to live our lives so that we could be willing and available to do whatever God asks. We look for ways we can be serviceable to our friends and we try to be diligent in attending the temple, completing church assignments, and doing "the little things." We build each other up in our words and actions, and hope to pass on a legacy of love and faith to our children.

What do Mormons believe about “eternal life?”

Katie B.
Eternal life is more than just living forever. Eternal life, as we understand it, is being resurrected with perfect bodies and living forever with Heavenly Father, Jesus Christ, and our families. To paraphrase someone more eloquent, "Heaven wouldn't be heaven if I wasn't there with my family." To attain eternal life, we have to do all that we can here and now, while we're in this part of life. Something that I think is really cool that the church teaches is that there's always room for improvement - there's no reason to ever be bored or stagnant! We can prepare ourselves for eternity by becoming more Christlike a day at a time, and never giving up. Life is hard, and that's true for everyone, but the end result, "eternal life", will be worth it. Show more Show less

What do Mormons believe happens to us after we die? What do Mormons believe about life after death?

Katie B.
I don't ever remember really being afraid of dying, especially when I thought about what it would be like. Mormons believe that the spirit that is you, that gives your body life, existed before you were born on earth and will continue to exist after you die. I've always thought of death as a sort of awakening from a nap, or walking from one room to another - a change, rather than as an ending. I miss the people I know who've died, and I wish I had known them better, but I know I'll see them again. After we die, we will still be ourselves, and we will be greeted by people who love us. There will be a judgment day, and based on how we lived our life, we will be rewarded. The ultimate reward is living forever in the presence of God with our families. Show more Show less

Why do Mormons perform baptisms for the dead?

Katie B.
Jesus Christ isn't just the God of the Jews, or the Catholics, or the Mormons - He's the God of the whole earth, and loves every one of us. Baptism is necessary to get into the kingdom of God, but what about people who were born and died without getting baptized? They can be good people and love God, but they also need baptism. So, God provided a way for them to receive the blessings of baptism after they've died, if they didn't get the chance while they were living. That's why we do proxy baptisms - to do it for them, so that they, in Heaven, can choose to accept it and be able to progress to be with God in His kingdom. Show more Show less

Why are only some Mormons allowed into temples? Is there something secret going on in Mormon Temples? What goes on in Mormon Temples?

Katie B.
A common response to these questions is that "It's not secret, it's sacred, and there's an important difference. That's why we don't talk about it all the time, because it's so personal and we treat the subject with respect." All that happens in the temple is uplifting, holy, and ennobling. I feel peaceful, and more in tune with my divine potential and eternal identity when I work in the temple, especially when I prepare myself with scripture reading, occasional fasting, and lots of prayer before I go. There are sacred ceremonies that can only take place in temples which help you with what you've been trying to do all along - to become more Christlike so you can enjoy eternal life with Him in heaven. Once you've done them for yourself, you go back to do proxy work to help those who've died receive the same blessings. Temple work is family work: in the temples, families are bound together for eternity and given blessings. I've heard it said, "We would love for everyone to be able to come to the temple, but there's some things you need to do first," and it's totally true. I love the temple, and I wish I had prepared myself more meaningfully before I went for the first time. Every time you go to the temple, you learn through repetition and understand a little more than the last time, so it's important to make temple worship a habit instead of a one-time occurrence. Show more Show less